"Something Wicked This Way Comes" - Macbeth Fan Night With Alan Cumming

By Carey Purcell
10 Jul 2013

The effort to attract a younger audience is important to Cumming, who said, "I think it's to be encouraged, because it means there's a different way to get people into the theatre. And we need to get younger people into the theatre — the next generation of playwrights and performers."

While performing in Macbeth, Cumming has suffered various injuries due to the intensity of the play and his performance. When asked to list them, he said, "I'd be here until midnight," before mentioning a possibly rotated cuff, inner and outer ear problems and massive bruises as just a few of his battle wounds.

"It feels like someone's trapped in my body, trying to get out, writhing in my body," he said before revealing a large bruise on his back.

Despite his injuries, Cumming has survived the run, following a strict regimen of diet, exercise and vitamins.



"I've been really, really looking after myself," he said. "I'm trying not to party too much. And it's actually worked. I've only got four [performances] to go."

While Macbeth is coming to an end, Cumming may be returning to the stage soon in the hotly rumored revival of Cabaret, revisiting the role of Emcee, which won him a Tony Award in 1998. The production has not been confirmed by the Roundabout Theatre, but there was much speculation amongst people at "Macbeth Fan Night" as to whom would co-star with Cumming as Sally Bowles.

Cumming would not comment on Cabaret, but he did say he would enjoy doing a comedy onstage one day.

"Every play I do is so dark and bleak. Really. I can't think of the last time I did a comedy," he said. "In films I do. I guess when I do something in the theatre it's such a commitment, it has to be something I'm really passionate about. I guess there's more at stake, more to dig into, with something like this for me, than comedy. But right now I'd love to do some sort of farce."

While Cumming's fans have enjoyed his dark turn in the Scottish Play, he said, "I love it when people at the stage door say to me, ‘This is my first Broadway show!' I tell them, ‘They're not always like this. They're usually a bit lighter.'"